Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ answers are available for the topics below. Please send feedback about this page to cve@mitre.org.

    Introduction
    Community
    CVE Board
    CVE Numbering Authority (CNA)
    CVE Entries
    CVE List Basics
    Using the CVE List
    CVE Request Web Form

Introduction

    What is CVE?
    What is the relationship between CVE and NVD (U.S. National Vulnerability Database)?
    Who owns CVE?
    Is CVE intended for public use? How can CVE help me?
    Why CVE? Is there a lot of support for something like this?
    Isn't CVE just another vulnerability database?
    Can't hackers use this to break into my network?
    What is a "vulnerability"?
    What is an "exposure"?

What is CVE?

CVE is a dictionary that provides definitions for publicly disclosed cybersecurity vulnerabilities and exposures. The goal of CVE is to make it easier to share data across separate vulnerability capabilities (tools, databases, and services) with these definitions. CVE Entries are comprised of an identification number, a definition, and at least one public reference.

What is the relationship between CVE and the NVD (U.S. National Vulnerability Database)?

The CVE List feeds the U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD), which then builds upon the information included in CVE Entries to provide enhanced information for each Entry such as fix information, severity scores, and impact ratings.

NVD also provides advanced searching features such as by individual CVE ID; by OS; by vendor name, product name, and/or version number; and by vulnerability type, severity, related exploit range, and impact. Read the NVD FAQs on the NVD website.

Who owns CVE?

CVE is sponsored by US-CERT in the office of Cybersecurity and Communications at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Operating as DHS's Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), MITRE has copyrighted the CVE List for the benefit of the community in order to ensure it remains a free and open standard, as well as to legally protect the ongoing use of it and any resulting content by government, vendors, and/or users. In addition, MITRE has trademarked ® the CVE acronym and the CVE logo to protect their sole and ongoing use by the CVE effort within the cybersecurity arena.

Is CVE intended for public use? How can CVE help me?

CVE is free to use and publicly available to anyone interested in correlating data between different vulnerability or security tools, repositories, and services. You may search or download CVE, copy it, redistribute it, reference it, and analyze it, provided you do not modify CVE itself. You may also link to specific CVE Entry pages from your website, product, publication, or other capability. See the terms of use.

CVE helps because it provides a standardized identifier for a given vulnerability or exposure. Knowing this common identifier allows you to quickly and accurately access information about the problem across multiple information sources that are compatible with CVE. For example, if you own a security tool whose reports contain references to CVE IDs, you may then access fix information in a separate database that is compatible with CVE. CVE also provides you with a baseline for evaluating the coverage of your tools. With CVE's common identifiers, you'll know exactly what each tool covers allowing you to determine which tools are most effective and appropriate for your organization's needs.

In addition, if the security advisories your organization receives are compatible with CVE, you can see if your vulnerability scanners check for this threat and then determine whether your intrusion detection system has the appropriate attack signatures to identify attempts to exploit particular vulnerabilities. If you build or maintain systems for customers, the CVE compatibility of advisories will help you to directly identify any fixes from the vendors of the commercial software products in those systems (if the vendor fix site is compatible with CVE). See Enterprise Security Enabled by CVE for additional information.

Why CVE? Is there a lot of support for something like this?

Using a common identifier makes it easier to share data across separate databases, tools, and services, which until the creation of CVE in 1999, were not easily integrated. If a report from a security capability incorporates CVE IDs, you may then quickly and accurately access fix information in one or more separate CVE-compatible tools, services, and repositories to remediate the problem. With CVE, your tools and services can "speak" (i.e., exchange data) with each other. You'll know exactly what each covers because CVE provides you with a baseline for evaluating the coverage of your tools. This means you can determine which tools are most effective and appropriate for your organization's needs. In short, CVE-compatible tools, services, and databases will give you better coverage, easier interoperability, and enhanced security.

CVE is industry-endorsed by the CVE Numbering Authorities (CNAs), CVE Board, and the numerous organizations that include CVE IDs in their products, services, and vendor alerts and security advisories.

Isn't CVE just another vulnerability database?

No. CVE is not a vulnerability database. CVE is designed to allow vulnerability databases and other capabilities to be linked together, and to facilitate the comparison of security tools and services. As such, CVE does not contain information such as risk, impact, fix information, or detailed technical information. CVE only contains the standard identifier number with status indicator, a brief description, and references to related vulnerability reports and advisories. (Note: The U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD) provides fix, scoring, and other information for CVE Entries on the CVE List.)

Can't hackers use this to break into my network?

Any public discussion of vulnerability information may help a hacker. However, there are several reasons why the benefits of CVE outweigh its risks:

What is a "vulnerability"?

A "vulnerability" is a weakness in the computational logic (e.g., code) found in software and some hardware components (e.g., firmware) that, when exploited, results in a negative impact to confidentiality, integrity, OR availability. Mitigation of the vulnerabilities in this context typically involves coding changes, but could also include specification changes or even specification deprecations (e.g., removal of affected protocols or functionality in their entirety).

See the Terminology page for a complete explanation of how this term is used on the CVE website.

What is an "exposure"?

An "exposure" is a system configuration issue or a mistake in software that allows access to information or capabilities that can be used by a hacker as a stepping-stone into a system or network.

See the Terminology page for a complete explanation of how this term is used on the CVE website.

Community

    How can my organization and I be involved?
    PRODUCT/SERVICE COMPATIBILITY
    What does it mean for a product or service to be compatible with CVE?
    How do I make my product or service compatible with CVE?
    How can my organization register our product or service as compatible with CVE?
    SPONSOR
    Who sponsors CVE? What is the relationship between CVE and DHS?
    MITRE'S ROLE
    What is MITRE's role in CVE?

How can my organization and I be involved?

PRODUCT/SERVICE COMPATIBILITY

What does it mean for a product or service to be compatible with CVE?

Compatible with CVE means that a tool, website, database, or other security product or service uses CVE IDs in a manner that allows it to be cross-referenced with other products that employ CVE IDs.

Different tools provide different coverage/cross-referencing of CVE IDs (e.g., some tools might cover Unix, while others cover Windows). You will need to evaluate any CVE-compatible products and services based upon your organization's specific requirements.

How do I make my product or service compatible with CVE?

See CVE Compatibility Guidelines.

How can my organization register our product or service as compatible with CVE?

The previous CVE Compatibility Program of declarations and questionnaires has been discontinued and its product listings have been moved to "archive" status. The CVE Team will no longer accept declarations or questionnaires. Instead, a CVE Compatibility Guidelines document has been provided to assist you in making your product or service compatible with CVE.

SPONSOR

Who sponsors CVE? What is the relationship between CVE and DHS?

CVE is sponsored by US-CERT in the office of Cybersecurity and Communications at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. In addition, US-CERT incorporates CVE IDs into its security advisories whenever possible and advocates the use of CVE, and products and services that are compatible with CVE, to the U.S. government and all members of the cybersecurity community.

MITRE'S ROLE

What is MITRE's role in CVE?

The MITRE Corporation (MITRE) currently manages and maintains the CVE List and this website, oversees the CVE Numbering Authorities (CNAs) and CVE Board, conducts community outreach activities, and provides neutral guidance throughout the process to ensure that CVE serves the public interest. In addition, the MITRE CVE Team currently functions as the Primary CNA.

CVE Board

    Who is the CVE Board?
    Are Board discussions public?
    Is there a Board charter?
    How are new members added to the Board?

Who is the CVE Board?

The CVE Board includes numerous cybersecurity-related organizations including commercial security tool vendors, academia, research institutions, government departments and agencies, and other prominent security experts, as well as end-users of vulnerability information. Through open and collaborative discussions, the Board provides critical input regarding the data sources, product coverage, coverage goals, operating structure, and strategic direction of the CVE program.

Refer to the CVE Board page for additional information, and a complete list of current members.

Are Board discussions public?

Yes, please see:

Is there a Board charter?

Yes, please see the CVE Board Charter.

How are new members added to the Board?

Per the CVE Board Charter, "Prospective Board members (prospects) are those people, either at-large (i.e., independent), or representing an organization in industry, academia, or government, who will add value to the CVE Program. Prospects may be identified by anyone; however, a prospect must be nominated by a voting Board member."

Also see Adding and Removing CVE Board Members for additional information.

CVE Numbering Authority (CNA)

    What is a CVE Numbering Authority (CNA)?
    Is there a "How-To" manual for CNAs?
    How do we request blocks of CVE IDs using the web form?
    How can my organization become a CNA?

What is a CVE Numbering Authority (CNA)?

A CVE Numbering Authority (CNA) is an organization that distributes CVE IDs to researchers and information technology vendors for inclusion in first-time public announcements of new vulnerabilities, without directly involving the CVE Team in the details of the specific vulnerabilities.

Visit Participating CNAs to see the number and types of participating CNAs from around the world.

To review the products covered by each CNA, and contact information, visit the CNA Coverage section on the Request a CVE ID page.

Is there a "How-To" manual for CNAs?

See Documentation for CNAs and Submitting CVE Assignment Information to the CVE Team.

How do we request blocks of CVE IDs using the web form?

See What if I need more than 10 CVE IDs?

Also, please refer to the CVE Request Web Form section of this FAQs page for additional information about using the CVE Request web form.

How can my organization become a CNA?

See Become a CNA.

CVE Entries

    CVE ENTRY BASICS
    What is a CVE Entry?
    What is a CVE ID?
    What is the new CVE ID syntax and when did it change?
    What is the significance and meaning of the YEAR portion of a CVE ID?
    How are the CVE Entry DESCRIPTIONS created or compiled?
    Are there REFERENCES available for CVE Entries?
    What does DATE ENTRY CREATED signify in a CVE Entry?
    STATES OF CVE ENTRIES
    What does it mean when a CVE Entry is marked "RESERVED"?
    What does it mean when a CVE Entry is marked "DISPUTED"?
    What does it mean when a CVE Entry is marked "REJECT"?
    Why is a CVE Entry marked as "RESERVED" when a CVE ID is being publicly used?
    UPDATING INFORMATION IN CVE ENTRIES
    How can I update existing information, or add new information, to a CVE Entry Description or Reference?
    REQUESTING NEW CVE IDs
    How can I obtain a CVE ID?

CVE ID BASICS

What is a CVE Entry?

A CVE Entry is an item in the CVE List. Each CVE Entry includes the following:

What is a CVE ID?

A CVE ID is the number portion of a CVE Entry, for example, "CVE-1999-0067", "CVE-2014-12345", and "CVE-2016-7654321".

CVE IDs are used by cybersecurity product/service vendors and researchers as a standard method for identifying vulnerabilities and for cross-linking with other repositories that also use CVE IDs. See About CVE Entries for additional information.

What is the new CVE ID syntax and when did it change?

CVE ID syntax defines the ID number component of a CVE Entry, for example, "CVE-2014-9999999", which includes the CVE prefix + year + sequence number digits.

With the new syntax, CVE IDs can now have 4 or more digits in the sequence number portion of the ID. For example, CVE-YYYY-NNNN with 4 digits in the sequence number, CVE-YYYY-NNNNN with 5 digits in the sequence number, CVE-YYYY-NNNNNNN with 7 digits in the sequence number, and so on.

The change was necessary because the CVE ID syntax used since the inception of CVE in 1999, CVE-YYYY-NNNN, only supports a maximum of 9,999 unique identifiers per year. Due to the ever increasing volume of public vulnerability reports, the CVE Board and CVE Team determined that the CVE Program needed to change the syntax of its standard vulnerability identifiers so that CVE can track more than 10,000 vulnerabilities in a single year. The new CVE ID syntax was determined in a vote by the CVE Board, details of which are available in the CVE Board Discussion List Archives.

The CVE ID Syntax Change took effect on January 1, 2014, and CVE IDs using the new syntax were first issued on January 13, 2015. The Distributed Weakness Filing (DWF) CNA is also actively assigning CVE IDs with seven digits, as of May 24, 2016.

Please see CVE ID Syntax Change (Archived) and Technical Guidance for Handling the New CVE ID Syntax (Archived) for additional information.

What is the significance and meaning of the YEAR portion of a CVE ID

CVE IDs have the format CVE-YYYY-NNNNN. The YYYY portion is the year that the CVE ID was assigned OR the year the vulnerability was made public (if before the CVE ID was assigned).

The year portion is not used to indicate when the vulnerability was discovered, but only when it was made public or assigned.

Examples:

NOTE: Neither the date when a vulnerability was introduced into a product, or the date when a vulnerability was fixed in a product, factor into what year is indicated in the CVE ID assigned to that vulnerability.

How are the CVE Entry DESCRIPTIONS created or compiled?

The "Description" portion of CVE Entries are typically written by CVE Numbering Authorities (CNAs), the CVE Team, or individuals requesting a CVE ID.

Descriptions should be unique and provide the relevant details to help users (1) find the CVE Entry for a specific vulnerability, and/or (2) distinguish between similar-looking vulnerabilities.

Ideally, Descriptions include details such as the name of the affected product and vendor, a summary of affected versions, the vulnerability type, the impact, the access that an attacker requires to exploit the vulnerability, and the important code components or inputs that are involved.

However, if this information is not available to the submitter of a CVE Entry, not all Descriptions will include all these details. For example, to write a CVE Description, the CVE Team analyzes public, third-party reports of vulnerabilities (i.e., "references"); extracts the relevant information from each reference; resolves any conflicting information or inconsistent usage of terminology; and then writes the description. In this example, the CVE Team only has access to publicly available information which may not include all the details of the ideal Descriptions.

Are there REFERENCES available for CVE Entries?

Each CVE Entry includes appropriate References. Each reference used in CVE (1) identifies the source, (2) includes a well-defined identifier to facilitate searching on a source's website, and (3) notes the associated CVE ID.

The CVE website also includes a Reference Maps page with links to documents from the commonly used information sources that are used as references for CVE Entries.

What does DATE ENTRY CREATED signify in a CVE Entry?

The "Date Entry Created" date in a CVE Entry indicates when the CVE ID was issued to a CVE Numbering Authority (CNA) or the CVE Entry published on the CVE List.

This date does not indicate when the vulnerability was discovered, shared with the affected vendor, publicly disclosed, or updated in CVE. That information may or may not be included in the description or references of a CVE Entry, or in the enhanced information for the CVE Entry that is provided in the U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD).

Also see: FOCUS ON: The Significance and Meaning of the Year Portion of a CVE ID.

STATES OF CVE ENTRIES

What does it mean when a CVE Entry is marked "RESERVED"?

A CVE Entry is marked as "RESERVED" when it has been reserved for use by a CVE Numbering Authority (CNA) or security researcher, but the details of it are not yet populated. A CVE Entry can change from the RESERVED state to being populated at any time based on a number of factors both internal and external to the CVE List. Once the CVE Entry is populated with details and published on the CVE List, it will become available in the U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD). As one of the final steps in the process, the NVD Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) scores for the CVE Entries are assigned by the NIST NVD team.

What does it mean when a CVE Entry is marked "DISPUTED"?

When one party disagrees with another party's assertion that a particular issue in software is a vulnerability, a CVE Entry assigned to that issue may be designated as being "DISPUTED". In these cases, CVE is making no determination as to which party is correct. Instead, we make note of this dispute and try to offer any public references that will better inform those trying to understand the facts of the issue.

When you see a CVE Entry that is "DISPUTED", we encourage you to research the issue through the references or by contacting the affected vendor or developer for more information.

What does it mean when a CVE Entry is marked "REJECT"?

A CVE Entry listed as "REJECT" is a CVE Entry that is not accepted as a CVE Entry. The reason a CVE Entry is marked REJECT will most often be stated in the description of the CVE Entry. Possible examples include it being a duplicate CVE Entry, it being withdrawn by the original requester, it being assigned incorrectly, or some other administrative reason.

As a rule, REJECT CVE Entries should be ignored.

However, there may be cases where a CVE Entry previously marked as REJECT might need to move back to RESERVED or a populated state (i.e., the details and References are published and included). An example case could include a simple accidental REJECT, where a CVE Entry was marked as REJECT by a CVE Numbering Authority (CNA) but the CVE ID was used publicly. In this case, it would create more confusion and additional work to REJECT the already used CVE ID, assign a new CVE ID, and also make sure that all public references are updated. The change discussed here would be to simply change the REJECT CVE Entry and populate it with the details that were intended.

Also see: FOCUS ON: Marking a CVE ID “REJECT” Is Not Permanent; It Can Be Updated and Added to the CVE List.

Why is a CVE Entry marked as "RESERVED" when a CVE ID is being publicly used?

A CVE Entry is marked as "RESERVED" when it has been reserved for use by a CVE Numbering Authority (CNA) or security researcher, but the details of it are not yet populated. Often, this is because the original requester of the CVE ID assignment has not sent an update to the CVE Team including the information needed to populate the CVE Entry. Note that a CVE Entry cannot be populated with details until a public reference exists that describes the vulnerability in question.

If you are aware of a CVE ID that is being used publicly but is not yet included in the CVE List (i.e., CVE Entry is still marked as RESERVED), or you have additional information for an already populated CVE Entry, you can request that the CVE Entry be updated through the CVE Request web form.

UPDATING INFORMATION IN CVE ENTRIES

How can I update existing information or add new information to a CVE Entry Description or Reference?

You may request an update to a CVE Entry, provide notification about a vulnerability publication, or submit comments via our CVE Request web form. See the CVE Request Web Form Overview, Web Form Tip Sheet, and/or Web Form FAQs for additional information.

If you wish to make a specific "vendor statement" for potential inclusion in the U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD), you can use NVD's "Vendor Comments" feature at https://nvd.nist.gov for a specific CVE Entry.

REQUESTING NEW CVE IDs

How can I obtain a CVE ID?

See Request a CVE ID.

CVE List Basics


Does the CVE List contain all vulnerabilities and exposures?

The intention of CVE is to be comprehensive with respect to all publicly known vulnerabilities and exposures. And while CVE prioritizes the assignment of CVE Entries for the products, vendors, and product categories listed on the Request a CVE ID page, a CVE ID may be requested for any vulnerability.

Where does CVE find out about these vulnerabilities and exposures?

CVE IDs are assigned by CVE Numbering Authorities (CNAs) from around the world. As Primary CNA, the CVE Team also accepts requests for CVE IDs. Please see Request a CVE ID for details.

How does a vulnerability or exposure become a CVE Entry?

The process begins with the discovery of a potential security vulnerability or exposure. The information is then assigned a CVE ID by a CVE Numbering Authority (CNA), the CNA writes the Description and adds any References, and then the completed CVE Entry is posted on the CVE website by the CVE Team.

Generally, the CVE approach is to create separate CVE Entries for independently fixable vulnerabilities, except when they are the result of a shared codebase, library, protocol, or standard. CVE Editorial Policies, which are the guidelines the CVE Program uses to ensure that CVE Entries are created in a consistent fashion, independent of which CNA is doing the creation, include the following: CVE Counting Rules, CVE Assignment Information Format, and Process to Correct Counting Issues.

Also see Creation of a CVE Entry for additional information.

Why doesn't CVE include fix information, impact, classification, or other important technical details?

This information can already be found in numerous vulnerability websites, databases, and security tool databases. CVE doesn't have this information because CVE is intended to link these different vulnerability capabilities, not to replace them.

Note: The U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD) provides fix and other information for entries on the CVE List.

Why doesn't CVE use a taxonomy?

Developing a universally applicable taxonomy for vulnerabilities is an ongoing area of research. One goal of CVE is to capture community agreement. The enumeration and categorization of vulnerabilities are different (albeit related) efforts. The effort of building and populating the CVE List may facilitate further advances in the study of vulnerability taxonomies.

Are there release versions of the CVE List?

No. The most current version of the CVE List is available on the CVE List page.

Why did CVE retire the term CVE "candidates"?

When the CVE effort first began in 1999 and vulnerabilities were discovered and published less frequently than they are today, CVEs were issued "candidate" or "entry" status, where candidate status indicated that the identifier was under review for inclusion on the CVE List and entry status indicated that the identifier has been formally accepted to the list. CVEs with candidate status used the CAN-prefix (e.g., "CAN-1999-0067"), while CVEs with entry status used the CVE-prefix (e.g., "CVE-1999-0067"). This meant that the individual identifier numbers themselves would need to be changed once a candidate had been updated to entry status, placing a significant burden on the numerous vendors and organizations around the world that would in turn need to update their tools and processes to accommodate the replacement identifier numbers. This became especially burdensome as the volume of vulnerabilities being discovered and added to the CVE List increased dramatically each year (CVE Entries are now added to the CVE website on a daily basis). Therefore, at the request of the community, as of 2005 all CVE Entries now use the CVE-prefix and are immediately usable by the community. While references and other supporting information may be updated over time, the CVE ID itself does not change once it has been assigned to an issue.

Does CVE have a data feed of new CVE IDs?

Yes, visit CVE New Data Feed or follow https://twitter.com/CVEnew/ to get regular updates of the newest CVE IDs.

Visit Other Updates & Feeds for information about other feeds of CVE information including those available from the U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD).

Does the CVE List include severity ratings (i.e., CVSS scores) for CVE Entries?

No, the CVE List does not include severity ratings for CVE Entries.

However, severity scores for CVE Entries are provided by the U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD) at https://nvd.nist.gov/cvss.cfm.

Using the CVE List

    Someone has hacked into my website. Can CVE help me recover?
    How can CVE help me protect my network?
    How will CVE help me compare security tools?
    Can I include CVE IDs in my product/database/security advisory/etc.?
    Is CVE content available in Common Vulnerability Reporting Framework (CVRF) format?
    Are CVE Entries mapped to IAVAs?
    How do I download a copy of CVE?
    How do I search CVE?
    Can I search CVE by operating system?
    I searched CVE and I got two or more results back. How can I tell which is the one I want?

Someone has hacked into my website. Can CVE help me recover?

CVE cannot help you to determine precisely what vulnerability an attacker may have exploited to obtain unauthorized access. But once you determine what vulnerability was exploited, you could find the CVE ID and use it to examine information sources that are compatible with CVE in order to obtain fix information, technical details, and other information that will be helpful to you.

How can CVE help me protect my network?

By using the CVE ID for a particular vulnerability or exposure, you will be able to quickly and accurately obtain information from a variety of information sources that are compatible with CVE. By facilitating better comparisons between different security tools and services, CVE can help you make a better choice as to which of these capabilities are appropriate for your needs. You may also be able to create a suite of interoperable security tools and capabilities from multiple vendors, if those tools and capabilities incorporate CVE as a translation mechanism.

Using products and services that are compatible with CVE will allow you to improve how your organization responds to security advisories. If the advisory includes CVE ID, you can see if your scanners or security service checks for this threat and then determine whether your intrusion detection system has the appropriate attack signatures. If you build or maintain systems for customers, the CVE compatibility of advisories will help you to directly identify any fixes from the vendors of the commercial software products in those systems (if the vendor fix site is compatible with CVE).

Other indirect benefits may also arise from CVE. For example, it facilitates better research on vulnerabilities and exposures. See Enterprise Security Enabled by CVE for additional information.

How will CVE help me compare security tools?

With CVE, your vulnerability databases, services, and tools can "speak" to each other. Until the creation of CVE in 1999 it was very difficult to effectively decide which tool was the most appropriate for an organization's needs. Each vendor used a different definition of "vulnerability" or "exposure" and used different metrics to state how many vulnerabilities or exposures they "check" or "test." CVE provides vendors with a standard list they can compare to, thus allowing you to compare apples to apples. CVE may also be useful for obtaining quantitative data on tool behaviors, such as how they perform their checks, the impact they have on the systems they examine, the rate of false positives or false negatives, or how quickly they update their tools when new entries are introduced into CVE.

Can I include CVE IDs in my product/database/security advisory/etc.?

Yes, CVE is free to use. You may search or download the CVE List, copy it, redistribute it, reference it, and analyze it, provided you do not modify CVE itself. You may also link to specific CVE Entry pages from your website, product, publication, or other capability. See the Terms of Use.

Is CVE content available in Common Vulnerability Reporting Framework (CVRF) format?

Yes, CVE content can be downloaded in Common Vulnerability Reporting Framework (CVRF) format on the Download CVE page. A single download of all CVE entries in CVRF format is available, as are downloads for individual calendar years in CVRF format such as 2017, etc. Visit the CVE Usage of CVRF page to learn more.

Are CVE IDs mapped to IAVAs?

Yes, CVE IDs are mapped to the U.S. Defense Information System Agency's (DISA) Information Assurance Vulnerability Alerts (IAVAs). Mapping downloads are available in XML and XLS format on DISA's Information Assurance Support Environment (IASE) website at https://disa.deps.mil/ext/cop/iase/IAVM/Pages/index.aspx. DoD PKI Certificates are required to access the information.

How do I download a copy of CVE?

See Download CVE.

How do I search CVE?

Visit Search CVE to search the CVE List by keyword(s) or by CVE ID.

Advanced searching of enhanced CVE List content is available via the U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD), which is based upon and synchronized with the CVE List.

Can I search CVE by operating system?

No. The CVE search was designed to help identify specific vulnerabilities and exposures, and not to find sets of problems that share common attributes such as operating systems. Therefore, you should not search CVE by operating system because your results will be incomplete.

Note: The U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD), which is based upon and synchronized with the CVE List, is searchable by operating system.

I searched CVE and I got two or more results back. How can I tell which is the one I want?

While the description for a CVE Entry should be able to uniquely identify a vulnerability or exposure, they are intentionally brief, and in some instances you may need to rely on the accompanying References to make a determination. When this occurs it is either because not enough details about the problem were originally provided, because the Description includes unique details that you may not be familiar with, or because of an error in the Description itself. In addition to referring to the References, you could also search through websites that are compatible with CVE by specifying the CVE Entries that you are uncertain about.

Note: The U.S. National Vulnerability Database (NVD) provides fix and other information for entries on the CVE List.

CVE Request Web Form

    WEB FORM BASICS
    How do I get to the CVE Request web form?
    Why should I use the web form?
    Where can I find additional help using the web form?
    USING THE WEB FORM
    What are the different choices for request type?
    How do I access the Product and Sources list when I am using the CVE Request web form?
    What if I realized I entered something wrong? Can I edit the information I entered on the web form after I submit it?
    Can I add an attachment?
    I have trouble seeing the security code, or CAPTCHA, at the end of the form. Is there any other way to submit my form?
    I don't understand the note after I submit my request that says I should close my browser and open it again. What does that mean? Should I do it?
    What if I need more than 10 CVE IDs?
    Why does the form get so big when I request more than one CVE ID?
    How can I encrypt my requests via the web form?
    AFTER SUBMITTING YOUR WEB FORM REQUEST
    How do I know that my CVE request has been received?
    What if I realize, after submitting the form, that I need to request more CVE IDs?
    What do I do if I need to follow up on a request made through the CVE Request web form that has not been completed?
    How do I know when my request has been fulfilled? Is there a place I can look online to see a status?
    My request for CVE IDs was rejected. How do I follow up?

How do I get to the CVE Request web form?

The CVE Request web form is available at https://cveform.mitre.org.

Why should I use the web form?

The CVE Team assigns tickets to all new requests submitted via the CVE Request web form, which allows us to better track and manage the requests than if they were submitted through some other means.

Please use the web form for:

Once you have submitted your request, you will receive an email confirming receipt of your request and a reference number. Any additional communications related to that request will be done through email using the same subject line as the confirmation email.

Where can I find additional help using the web form?

In addition to these CVE Request web form FAQs, additional help and user guidance are available in the following locations:

Finally, you may also choose the "Other" request type on the CVE Request web form itself and enter any questions you have into the free-text field. The CVE Team will receive this information and respond to your question(s) via email.

USING THE WEB FORM

What are the different choices for request type?

The choices for a request type are:

How do I access the Product and Sources list when I am using the CVE Request web form?

Select the "Request a CVE ID" request type and, in the grey box, you will see a link to the product and sources list.

What if I realized I entered something wrong? Can I edit the information I entered on the web form after I submit it?

No, you cannot edit the form once it has been submitted; however, after submitting the web form, you will receive an email confirmation with a reference number, and you can reply to that email with any changes. Do not modify the subject line, as it contains the reference number associated with your request.

Can I add an attachment?

The web form does not accept attachments. However, in the event an attachment is necessary, it can be sent in a reply to the confirmation email you receive when you submit the form. Do not modify the subject line, as it contains the reference number associated with your request.

I have trouble seeing the security code, or CAPTCHA, at the end of the form. Is there any other way to submit my form?

The security code, or CAPTCHA, is required to complete the form. If you do not accurately type the CAPTCHA, you will receive an error message upon clicking the "Submit" button, along with a new CAPTCHA, which may be easier to view. If you continue to experience problems with the CAPTCHA, please contact us at cve@mitre.org.

I don't understand the note after I submit my request that says I should close my browser and open it again. What does that mean? Should I do it?

If you submit multiple requests in the same browser session, all requests will share a reference number and a single confirmation email will be sent (in response to the first request). If your requests are related, and need to be tracked together, you do not need to close your browser. If you refresh your browser or close and reopen your browser between each request, you will receive a new confirmation email and reservation number for each request.

What if I need more than 10 CVE IDs?

You can use the CVE Request web form to request up to 10 CVE IDs. If you need to request more than 10 CVE IDs, you can do so by submitting another request.

Please note that all requests within a single browser session will share a single reference number and will only receive a confirmation email for the first request. If you refresh your browser or close and reopen your browser between each request, you will receive a new confirmation email and reservation number for each request.

If you have questions or concerns about this process, please select the "Other" request type on the CVE Request web form.

User Tip: If you cannot type a new number into the field for entering the number of CVE IDs you are requesting, use backspace or the delete key to first clear the highlighted default number and then enter your desired number.

Why does the form get so big when I request more than one CVE ID?

When you request more than one CVE ID on the CVE Request web form, a separate set of required/optional fields for each of the CVE IDs requested is added, which causes the form to expand.

How can I encrypt my requests via the web form?

If you need to encrypt the details of your request, please enter your public PGP key into the "Enter a PGP Key" dialog box. If your PGP key is longer than 20,000 characters, please provide a URL for your PGP. If you do not have a URL, contact cve@mitre.org to identify an alternative suggestion. Provide generic details in the form as needed. MITRE will use the PGP key you provided to begin an encrypted dialogue with you via email.

AFTER SUBMITTING YOUR WEB FORM REQUEST

How do I know that my CVE request has been received?

You will receive an email confirmation once you submit the form, along with a reference number. If you later have any additional information to provide, please reply to that email. Do not modify the subject line, as it contains the reference number associated with your request.

Please note that all requests within a single browser session will share a single reference number and will only receive a confirmation email for the first request. If you refresh your browser or close and reopen your browser between each request, you will receive a new confirmation email and reservation number for each request.

User Tip: Please add cve-request@mitre.org and cve@mitre.org as safe senders in your email client before completing the form.

What if I realize, after submitting the form, that I need to request more CVE IDs?

You are able to complete the CVE Request web form as often as needed. If you submit a new request in the same browser session, all requests will share a reference number and a single confirmation email will be sent (in response to the first request). If you refresh your browser or close and reopen your browser between each request, you will receive a new confirmation email and reservation number for each request.

What do I do if I need to follow up on a request made through the CVE Request web form that has not been completed?

For requests that have not yet been completed (e.g., a CVE ID has not yet been assigned in response to a CVE ID request), you can provide additional information by replying to the confirmation email you received when you submitted the web form. Do not modify the subject line, as it contains the reference number associated with your request.

How do I know when my request has been fulfilled? Is there a place I can look online to see a status?

Status updates are not available via the website or web form. Once you submit the web form, all further communication regarding the request and its status takes place via email, with the same subject line that was in the original confirmation email. Requesters will be notified when their request is fulfilled. If a request was not fulfilled, the requester will receive an email notifying them of the decision and rationale (see My request for CVE IDs was rejected. How do I follow up?).

My request for CVE IDs was rejected. How do I follow up?

If you would like the CVE Assignment Team to reconsider a rejected request, please use the CVE Request web form to submit an "Other" request and include both the reference number of your original request and additional information that should be considered.

Page Last Updated or Reviewed: November 02, 2017